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Beating a dead horse: Are video games art?

When it comes to games, ‘design’ can mean a couple of things. It can mean the actual art (hmm) direction of the game, the design of the buildings, the characters, etc. It can also, however, mean gameplay design, the ease with which you are drawn into the game, the ways in which you find your way through the strange new world of the game.

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psyxon2384d ago

Eh, when articles like this don't get approved with haste. Why do I come on n4g again?

WiIIiam2383d ago (Edited 2383d ago )

Beating a dead horse? Indeed.

kevnb2383d ago

i dont care if they are, i like them.

LightofDarkness2383d ago (Edited 2383d ago )

If a film or tv show can be art, then so can games. I've often heard an argument that games are purely entertainment, because artists only comprise a part of their development alongside technical designers and programmers etc, i.e. only pieces of it are made by artists, the rest is purely technical.

So what are the crew in movies? There's a whole lot more production/technical staff involved in creating a movie than there are actors, directors and writers.

Both mediums are about experiences. In movies, the experience is brought about through it's story, dialogue and cinematography (special FX and sound can play larger roles at times). In games, these aren't really as important. In games, it's art direction/graphics and gameplay, with sound design et al also helping to forge the experience. It is the experience moulded by all of these elements that can have a lasting emotional effect on a player. Just like, you know, a movie.

Bottom line is that Roger Ebert is a pretentious old man who's afraid that he's falling out of touch (which he is) and that an art form has come along that he can't pass judgement on in any distinguished capacity and be admired for his ability to tell us how good or bad it is, so he's basically plugging his ears and shouting "LALALALALALA" until it goes away.

It's not going away, Roger.

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