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New standard could pave way for higher capacity Blu-ray discs

Engadget:

"Already feeling the pinch of a mere 25GB per layer on a Blu-ray disc? Neither are we, but it looks like Sony and Panasonic have been busily working on ways to boost capacity nonetheless, and they've now devised a new method that seems to be on the fast track to becoming a standard."

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RedDragan3674d ago

This stuff is old.

I posted the following on the Playstation forums in November and TDK did the 33GB layers way back in 2006 and that has 6 layers!

The 1TB BD disc was announced as in developement last year!

http://community.eu.playsta...

I got this information from Wiki. Engadget needs to catch up on the news, it is severely out of touch with Blu-Ray.

Elven63674d ago

There are many ways to get multiple layers onto a disc, various companies are looking at ways to make the technique more efficient both performance and cost wise, you can increase the layers on a disc but you lose out on something as well, I forgot what it was though, anyone fill me in?

I think the ultimate goal for these companies would be to create a higher capacity disc that is backwards compatible, at least to a certain extent with existing players.

LostDjinn3674d ago (Edited 3674d ago )

what the article is explaining (badly) is that a current 25 gig disk will have it's capacity increased to just over 33 gig using this index. It's not a new type of disk being released. That's why a firmware update will allow for its use instead of a new BD player.

Elven6, in order to increase layers on the disk, each layer needs to be more transparent than the last as blue light is prone to diffusion.

UltimateIdiot9113670d ago

You're missing the point. If you read the article, you would know what the issue was and why it took until now to become a standard.

From the source: The problem until now has been there was no evaluation technology appropriate for 33.4 GB media using PRML. PRML assumes inter-symbol interference, which makes it difficult to base optical disc quality evaluation on jitter, as is widely done now for Blu-ray and many other optical discs. A source at Sony Corp. states, "At high-density recording, such as 33.4 GB, the relationship between the error rate and jitter collapses, and it becomes extremely difficult to evaluate jitter."

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