kornbeaner (User)

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Why hasn't the U.S. embraced e-Sports?

kornbeaner | 1035d ago
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America, home of the free and land of the.....competitive. America for just about everything it takes as a hobby or sport is one of the most competitive places in the world. So why is it that the U.S. has yet to embrace what is probably the most competitive scene in a worldwide scale outside of the Olympics.
That scene? e-Sports. Outside of the Olympics and World Cup Soccer there is nothing bigger as far as international pride goes than the world of e-Sports. This weekend alone [Oct.16th 2011 weekend] saw the internets broadcast of the MLG (Major League Gaming) event in Orlando, FL as well as the independent broadcast of Season's Beatings 11 in Ohio.

MLG Orlando showcased competitors in three games Halo:Reach, Call of Duty:Black Ops and the biggest draw for the event Starcraft2: Wings of Liberty. Starcraft 2 saw players from around the globe showcasing to their skills in gathering resources, building armies, researching new weapons and upgrades for their armies; then controlling that army in the most efficient way to grant them the victory. This event saw competitors from the U.S., Europe and Asia battle it out to see who can call themselves the top player in the World. Season's Beating 2011[velocity] saw players battle it out in fighting games such as Super Street Fighter 4:A.E. (arcade edition), Marvel vs. Capcom 3 and Mortal Kombat. Season's Beating was a gathering of fighting game pros and top players [top players are slightly different than pro players as pro players are usually sponsored and top players are not] from the U.S. and Asia battling it out for fighting game pride.

One thing that caught my attention, other than the awesome skills of all the competitors at both events is the ads. Season's Beatings had an ad for the Movie "Texas Killing Fields" while MLG seemed to have Starbucks Coffee as a main advertiser with Hot Pockets having the occasional ad pop up between games. So that pops the question into my head, why hasn't the U.S. embraced e-Sports? ESPN will have you believe that a spelling bee can be considered a sport and during 4th of July weekend will show eating as a "sport" for the Nathan's hotdog eating challenge. So why can't pressing buttons at breakneck speeds while trying to determine what move is possible next be considered a sport? I mean the branding says it all "e-Sports" learning and mastering these games takes time and knowledge but also the ability to push one's digits and concentration to a very high level.

It obvious that some big companies are willing to throw money at the idea of e-sports, so why hasn't there been a partnership of sorts to at least highlight some the biggest moments in e-sports? To start off a network like SpikeTV, MTV or G4TV could schedule a midnight show maybe three times a week, showing a 30-minute highlight of some of the biggest matches to take place at a particular event or some sort of thrill inducing format.

The market is already primed for some sort of worldwide appeal as Starcraft is a national past-time in South Korea and fighting games especially a game like Street Fighter is considered to be the e-sport of Japan. There alone, the market is ready for a U.S. versus The World scenario, in which no matter where the U.S. is competitive there is always a prime market for support. I mean look at a sport like Soccer where the U.S. interest is very small compared to the worlds, but when the World Cup rolls around we have U.S. Soccer fans waving their flags, screaming their lungs out in hopes that this year will be the year where the U.S. can prove some sort of dominance over other nations. MLB (baseball) and NHL(hockey) have already been using similar formats for their all-star games with North America v. The world, helping gather more interest as those weekends roll around. I think with proper support, we can easily find ourselves screaming , U.S.A.!U.S.A.!U.S.A.! in the stands or from our home screens.

-kornbeaner

theonlylolking  +   1035d ago
ESPN is run by old people or out of touch peeps so it will not be shown for a while.
soundslike  +   1034d ago
E-sports has been embraced in the US

its just not a nation-wide obsession like other countries

In summary: USA != Asia
#2 (Edited 1034d ago ) | Agree(3) | Disagree(0) | Report | Reply
kramun  +   1034d ago
'In summary: USA != Asia '

What do you mean, and how does that work?
soundslike  +   1034d ago
different cultures

the "majority" of people in US who would like "sports" (in quotations to include e-sports) are into the NFL, NBA, MLB, NHL

Good luck trying to persuade those AMERICAN fans. Its just not going to happen that way

its a sub-culture but one steadily gaining in popularity. As more and more money gets thrown at tournaments it will grow, but make no mistake, its going to be for gamers and not the average "sports" fan for at least another decade.
kramun  +   1034d ago
Ah I see, yeah it won't be prime time viewing for a long time. It's the same in the UK, it's there but it is still very niche and will likely be for quite a while.

I don't think it will be taken seriously as a sport until we can stand in a booth and use our bodies to control the action. Then maybe it will overtake physical sports.

So yeah, it won't be taking on the big boys of sport for a long time. Probably many decades.
Tuxedo_Mask  +   1034d ago
I'm sure there is an audience for such events, but I for one wouldn't be a part of it. The only exception would be for fighting games, but I could care less about watching other people play FPS or RTS games. I don't watch the spelling bees or the eating contests either.

As for ESPN, they aren't the "worldwide leader of sports" as they claim to be when they don't broadcast Cricket, European/UK Soccer, or other sports yet do broadcast those events you mentioned which aren't even sports to begin with. I wouldn't be surprised if they started broadcasting poetry readings and cooking shows before they even considered something like e-Sports.
young7yang  +   1034d ago
Simple answer.. because we prefer to kick ass is real life.

I love video games... but when it comes to sports i prefer the real thing..
NJShadow  +   1033d ago
One of the best comments I've ever read on N4G. B)
Apotheosize  +   1034d ago
Because most american gamers play Call of Duty and think its the pinnacle of gaming skill
Pikajew  +   1034d ago
I love gaming but e-sports are a joke. Just have your gaming competitions and be happy.
#6 (Edited 1034d ago ) | Agree(2) | Disagree(0) | Report | Reply
dinkeldinkse  +   1034d ago
Probably the same reason people haven't embraced Curling,
Because they think it is a joke.
Speed-Racer  +   1033d ago
Because gaming as a sport a joke. Get outside and do something physical. Gaming is for recreational purposes yes, but don't mix it up with real sports.
young7yang  +   1033d ago
true!
seinfan  +   1033d ago
Watching somebody else play gets boring quick. I only do so if I've never played the game they're playing and I'm interested (even at that, I wouldn't want to watch for more than a few minutes). Also, I'd rather be the one playing because I could actually be decently good at it in a matter of days where as athletic sports such as basketball and football would take me years to get to the point where I'd be satisfied with my skills. And I'd have to go out of my way to join an organized team or get a group of people together where as with games, I'd have no problem hopping in on a game online to compete with others.
bwazy  +   1033d ago
There was a huge SC2 tourney at the local Pub where I go to University... Then again I'm in Canada.

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