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Writer's strike could boost thriving video game industry

As the Hollywood writers strike drags on, the video game industry is hoping a lack of fresh episodes in prime-time could motivate more people to pick up video game controllers instead of remotes - especially with the millions of Wiis and copies of "Call of Duty 4" found under Christmas trees this holiday season.

"If you're a fan of network programming, maybe seeing another repeat of 'Pushing Daisies' or 'Cold Case' will inspire you to finish that level of 'Ratchet and Clank Future' instead," suggests Joseph Olin, president of the Academy of Interactive Arts and Sciences.

Because game publishers rely almost completely on nonunion talent to create video games, the Writers Guild of America walkout hasn't been an issue for the gaming industry. Only a handful of game writers are represented by the WGA, and they fall outside of the jurisdiction of the current strike.

"There's a much better relationship between game developers and publishers than there appears to be in terms of all the polemics between the writers, producers and studios," says Olin.

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