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FCC Position May Spell the End of Unlimited Internet

FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski's unsurprising affirmation of support for network neutrality is a victory for the high-minded principle of open, unfettered internet access. Too bad it means the days of all-you-can-eat, flat-rate internet access are probably over.

Net neutrality sounds like a good idea. After all, it's the internet's openness to any and all users, applications and content that gave it such a resounding victory over closed networks like AOL, CompuServe and Prodigy. And there's no question that as a general business and networking principle, "anything goes" is both desirable and beneficial, to users and network operators alike. Over the long run, the most open networks attract the most customers and will be the most successful - and the most profitable.

But somewhere along the way, this principle of good network architecture turned into a political tenet that, according to some true believers, is almost equivalent to the Bill of Rights in importance.

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