Top
190°

'City of Heroes' character 'Twixt' becomes game's most hated outcast courtesy of Loyola professor

A role-player in an online game, he aimed the pointer at his opponent, the virtual comic book villain "Syphris." Myers, 55, flicked the buttons on his mouse and magically transported his opponent to the front of a cartoon robot execution squad. In an instant, the squad pulverized the player.

-New Orleans Metro News

The story is too old to be commented.
RememberThe3573056d ago

Seems the gamers made their own rules. I think this often happens in online spaces. If you don't play by the gamers rules you get black balled.

Great article by the way.

N4Flamers3056d ago

even in games like COD everyone wants you to play a certain way, thats the main reason I dont play too many online games everything is a race to the rocket launcher or you have to fight enemies a certain way. It sucks, and I agree with this article, makes me wish I played city of heroes I would have been right there with him.

Mo0eY3056d ago (Edited 3056d ago )

I'm the "dumbass" of many FPS. Frankly, I get bored after a while so I like to shoot at walls and make smiley faces. People on the mic start yelling at me to cooperate. Why? It's my game... It's not like me doing anything is going to help you guys win something especially if the teams are stacked.

Same goes for any MMOs I've played previously. I play the way I want to, not the way some forum posts says - "Put all your points into magic. You'll be godlike."

Grats to this professor.

Edit:

After researching a bit more, this professor's statements are pretty flabbergasted. So I will take back my grats.

Christopher3056d ago (Edited 3056d ago )

In MMOs, rules are very much attempted to be govern by the gamers.

Even in EQ the few that made rules about waiting lists for spawns and spawn camping would blacklist you if you didn't follow their rules. Even though it was actually against the rules to camp spawns, since you'd be preventing others from the same content by force and numbers. Luckily EQ last long enough that the developers saw many of these type of social rules being created and developed methods for reminding and curbing the player-derived rules from jeopardizing the general gameplay options available to others. I remember going back to EQ after a few years and killing gobbies in Butcherblock across the various camps and was told by a few parties of very high level players that I should get in line for killing them. Strange, I replied, the rules only mention that I shouldn't kill steal, not that I should stand in line to play the game. I am sure those guys blacklisted me right then and there, but couldn't do anything to stop me from playing the game other than getting to the mobs first.

This is my primary issue with MMOs in general, the fact that the more prominent players think they know what is best and typically end up getting a method of gameplay controlled in this manner. As an MMO player, I buck the typical trends and I play the game without regard to player-created rules, only to the concept of respecting the other players and abiding by the rules of the game as set by the developers.

Good article and definitely something that's been known for a while by MMO players but needs to have more face time with the general public. Many groups in MMOs are very much like high school cliques. Especially PvP MMOs (great examples are controlled PvP in DAoC and Battlegrounds in WoW)

JoySticksFTW3055d ago

I hear you about EQ, but a lot of the gamer rules are set to make the game more fun for everyone.

I also remember going to BB to gob hunt and shouting a camp check. After the responses, I'd politely ask the players to send me a pm when they were done or the time that they would be done. That worked great.

I'd just go adventure someplace else or log off for a while until the time that they gave me was coming near.

That prevented over-camping or too many player, not enough mobs. Same thing in FFXI when that first started (don't know about now). It sucks when there're not enough xp to go around. Too many groups in one area meant that you couldn't chain xp and the leveling was slow.

It can be frustrating but there's usually a good reason behind gamer rules.

What I can't stand are the elite gamers that think you are gimp because you don't allocate points, skills, sub-jobs, armor, etc like they would. It's not about fun for them...

Some won't even group with you if they sniff imperfection.

Christopher3055d ago (Edited 3055d ago )

I see where you're coming from. Things usually do start with good intentions, but the number one thing that will always happen in MMOs is abuse of rules of any kind.

Remember in my story how I said they were high level people camping gobbies. Also, I had just started again, meaning that I was very low level and at the time needed the gobbies for quests that would give me gear that would allow me to safely attack more creatures in the area. An option of spending half an hour to travel to another area just because some high levels that don't need the mobs at all except for money is not good or right, it's an abuse of a player-derived rule.

In any MMO, if I have a quest to kill a generic mob of any type, I should not have to wait in a line but have the opportunity to openly go and find them and kill them while still respecting the needs of others. The problem is that in EQ they created a rule that defied this concept and instead was tailored towards people who had A) the level power to enforce such rules by controlling the camps and B) the time to waste on waiting for others to finish camping spawn points.

Luckily, it was this exact situation that lead to so many changes in the MMOs we play today (instanced raids, open spawn mob camps, etc.) so that this need for camping is unnecessary.

JoySticksFTW3055d ago

"An option of spending half an hour to travel to another area just because some high levels that don't need the mobs at all except for money is not good or right, it's an abuse of a player-derived rule."

"The problem is that in EQ they created a rule that defied this concept and instead was tailored towards people who had A) the level power to enforce such rules by controlling the camps and B) the time to waste on waiting for others to finish camping spawn points"

+ bubbles for the great points and conversation

mfwahwah3055d ago

I remember when me and a gang of friends in WoW made rogues. We went to Booty Bay and chain sapped EVERYBODY for a few hours because of boredom. Whenever they so much as touched us the guards would swarm them.

Less then 1 week later Blizzard fixed that issue and rendered my friend's rogue "Treesap" useless :P

+ Show (4) more repliesLast reply 3055d ago
farsided3056d ago

Makes me think about how I responded every time I got ganked playing WoW...Rather than continuing what I was doing or adjusting my play style to defend better against future attacks, I'd get my revenge on their faction, even if it meant ganking somebody completely different, just to make myself feel better. From time I spent with my friends who also played, it seemed that while this wasn't the *best* response, it was for the most part a social norm.

UltimateIdiot9113056d ago

I guess this one of the things that give the negative ideas about a hardcore/elite gamer. It's usually the powerful players that make the social norms and eventually others give in to it. Those who are new or does not play often will be out of the loop and as a result, break all these norms.

Even if the players are people with life outside the game, I guess it's human nature for many to endorse norms through medieval like action which makes it quite sad.

Silent3055d ago

What David Myers did was droning. Thats blows. Droning players like that means ur a d---head. Im a CoH/CoV player. I seen peeps that does that and believe me you'll never here the end of it. May David deserves some of it but some are out of the line.