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Is The PS3 "Truly" Harder To Develop For? Former Microsoft Employee Lays It All Out

Former Microsoft employee and current owner and creator of Calico Media, Ted Brockwood, answers all the questions laying on gamer's minds. The overview of questions asked and answered are below:

* As the lead director and producer of many upcoming multiplatform titles, which company has given you more freedom to do what you want with the title?

* Many people say the PS3 is much more difficult to develop for than the 360, is this true?

* When your company begins building and creating a title, do you guys have to limit what you could possibly do on the PS3 due to the weaker hardware of the 360?

* What is your thoughts on this console war so far? Do you feel the 360 will continue to outsell the PS3 and win the war, or do you think the PS3 has a chance to come back and outsell the 360?

* MUCH MUCH More

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frayer3406d ago

Frayer Frayer Frayer Frayer

Hallucinate3406d ago

you sir are a god
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Spike473406d ago (Edited 3406d ago )

I mean I don't think there has been any news lately about a dev struggling with the PS3.

And yea I didn't expect this guy to say too many nice things about the PS3 either way.

Nick2120043406d ago

I have a challenge for you and if you complete this challenge, you will reap the reward. The challenge is actually listen to the interview before commenting. If you complete this successfully, you will see that your comment makes no sense and you will not look like another stupid fanboy on this site that comments before reading or listening to the content.

RyuStrife3406d ago

I actually listened to the whole thing. So seriously, listen to the whole thing. The interviewee is actually a PS prefered guy.

George Costanza3406d ago

Its the Hip Hop Game..... oh wait!

FamilyGuy3406d ago

at 38:00 minutes in he says this and then says, the devs he worked with didn't have a problem with it.

Will_Smith3406d ago

i will not read the article before commenting... you know why?

YOU DON'T DESERVE HITS...

look at the questions you asked, the words you used. "War" "Weaker hardware" and "outsell".

you fail at journalism you hack, stop submitting your own propaganda for hits. You looks like you took all that bullsh*t straight out of that other fcuktard Hip Hop Gamer.

George Costanza3406d ago

Exactly, this guy has a huge PS3 bias and it shows in his writing, the many problems with N4G. This guy learnt everything he knows from HipHopGamer and all those other bull sites.

pain777pas3406d ago

To the website runner, keep up the good work and be unbiased. Great questions and a very honest guest that I was suprised by his cander. I listened to the whole thing too and was entertained by good questions and good answers as far as there knowledge goes.

IdleLeeSiuLung3406d ago

I don't like podcasts, I can't skim them....

kwicksandz3406d ago

Even sony admitted that it was hard to dev for. Remember their bs line about not wanting a system to be maxed out early?

IdleLeeSiuLung3406d ago

My take is if a developer paints something positive or neutral, they aren't necessarily being frank for obvious reasons. If they stick their neck out and say negative things, it is most likely true.

ZuperAmazingCooKie3406d ago

If you just want to make a PSN game that isn't necessarily a graphics powerhouse, then it's almost as easy as making a 360 game. In fact you can even make it on 360 and then port it to PS3 and never release it on 360 as the developer behind NobyNobyBoy did.

But anyway if you really want to squeeze the power out of PS3 then yes it's really hard to do so, especially if you want to do game specific stuff, because using a multiplatform engine like Unreal Engine 3 will only get you so far.

To take full advantage of the RSX you first have to write Vertex Shaders to run on the Cell processor for the RSX to run efficiently because the RSX is made for mostly pixel shaders. But to do that you have to manage memory correctly and that's apparently one of the hardest things to do when using the SPEs. Also, you have to write multithreaded code, i.e. take the code that you write for serial processors, analyse its complexity, and break it up into multiple threads in order for the SPEs to be taken advantage off.

So once you figure all of that out (memory management, multi-threading and graphics processing on the SPEs) and you achieved the quality you want in terms of graphics, you use the remaing power of the SPEs for physics which shouldn't be much problem, but for AI, even though it's definitely possible to make as seen with Heavenly Sword and Resistance 2, the AI routines are not your typical AI routines, they have to be re-written to take special advantage of the SPEs.

But again you'll probably require a lot of time to optimize the game to get it running smoothly. And that's why they say it's a pain in the ass to develop PS3 games, because to get them up to par or to surpass 360 and PC, you need to go down to the lowest levels of programming and know the machine very well, unlike 360 and PC where you have a familiar and friendly environment that doesn't require you to do much, especially if you're using the UE3.

All-33405d ago

Why the disagrees? Read it for yourselves then. Or continue to hide your heads in the sand and chant --> "let no bad happen"...

Kaz Hirai, was quoted in the February 2009 issue of the Official PlayStation Magazine:

Kaz Hirai: "We don't provide the 'easy to program for' console that (developers) want, because 'easy to program for' means that anybody will be able to take advantage of pretty much what the hardware can do, so then the question is, what do you do for the rest of the nine-and-a-half years? So it's a kind of--I wouldn't say a double-edged sword--but it's hard to program for, and a lot of people see the negatives of it, but if you flip that around, it means the hardware has a lot more to offer."

---

Sony's President of Worldwide Studios Phil Harrison was quoted saying:

"Nobody will ever use 100 percent of its capability due to firmware upgrades and new uses for the Sixaxis controller."

http://www.1up.com/do/newsS...

edgeofblade3405d ago

It was a great interview, and if you stopped to hear which console was "better" you missed the point. Toward the end, they say "the winners are the gamers."

It doesn't matter who wins. You have the experience that makes you happy, therefore, you should be happy. I'm all for a spirited debate on who's better, but just realize that it won't matter to anyone except the people who take it too seriously.

TheRealSpy023405d ago

is the interviewer 12 years old?

can't believe i sat here listening to Mumbles McVoicecrack for 20 minutes.

IcarusOne3405d ago

True indeed. It's a shame none of the fockwits on n4g seem to get that message.

Ted Brockwood certainly had a lot of interesting things to say. It's too bad the interviewer hasn't gotten out of puberty or his braces.

+ Show (12) more repliesLast reply 3405d ago
Quickstrike3406d ago

it does make sense that a Microsoft employ to say that anyway.

George Costanza3406d ago

From what I listened to I don't think he worked at Microsoft Game Studios as a developer at least....

gameplayer3406d ago

He built web pages for MS, he's in marketing not game design.

Sibs3406d ago

The same thing happened with the PS2, am I right? So instead of having the best off the bat and no improvement, we have a steady improvement and end up with a better end of generation game than comparable games on systems that were easy to optimize. Complexity isn't always a bad thing.

Personally, I like watching improvement over time, it makes me feel like I am the one they want to please by making better and better games.

Hallucinate3406d ago

i agree makes it seem more like an investment rather then a quick fix

Matpan3405d ago

yeah... for the first years, sure. But later on PC would totally crush PS2... long term evolution has it´s own limits. The machine, if perfectly used and coded for, can only give so much performance. I rather see all the bang in the beggining than see games that surpass KZ2 5 years in the future. Where a new generation of Graphics has appeared that eclypse that. Sure, you still have a nice gaming hardware, but already obsolete.

Hallucinate3405d ago

yea well 5 years later ps3 might be outdated compared to the pc but guess what? i spent 400 you spent like 700+

ravinash3405d ago

How many PCs would you have brought in that time.
To stay at the top spec for PCs, you would have to keep replacing the thing every 3 years or so.

+ Show (1) more replyLast reply 3405d ago
Kushan3406d ago

The PS3 isn't harder to develop for, per-se, it's just harder to get the absolute most out of it. It's not the CELL, it's just the fact that it's got 6 SPUs. If it had one big processor that was as powerful as all 6 combined, it'd be as easy to develop for as anything.
Multi-core programming in games is a fairly new concept. I mean, it's been done before, but not to a large extent, that kind of thing was usually reserved for large clusters of computers, scientific calculations, that sort of thing.
Even in general programming terms, it's a relatively new issue for most developers, since mainstream processors have only been multi-core for a few years now.
10 years from now, development technologies will have advanced so much that it'll be just as easy to develop for a 100-core machine as it is for a dual core machine and in that regard, the PS3 will be no more difficult to develop for than anything else, but for the moment, it's just not something a lot of developers are really used to.
I think we're at the point now where veteran developers know what they're doing, it's just the smaller, slightly more inexperienced companies that might have the most trouble.