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TTWO CEO: We'll Soon Be in a Cross-Platform World; Streaming Will Happen in One to Three Years

Take-Two CEO Strauss Zelnick said with confidence that gaming will soon be in a cross-platform world. He added that streaming games via cloud will happen in one to three years, though it might not necessarily lead to a boom in revenues as some think.

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Jackhass5d ago

Streaming is definitely coming faster than some might think.

gamer78044d ago

Nope, native local hardware will always be more powerful and not constrained due to consumers location and bandwidth.

playnice4d ago

I doubt it will « always » be like that but certainly for the foreseable future in most countries.

agent45324d ago

While I want to agree with you is just not feasible anymore to release consoles on par to current medium or high end PCs like in the past. Consoles evolution will be tv apps of Xbox live/PSN. The smart tv set already has the inputs/outputs plus the multimedia features of any console. Today's tvs come with 8 core processors, it only needs the thunderbolt port. That port allows any GPU to be connected to wimpy laptops turning say laptop into a gaming machine. Now picture a smart 4K tv set with thunderbolt port on top of 8 core processor. That will render.console hardware utterly useless.

neutralgamer19924d ago

Yeah you are right but than these publishers will lose millions of gamers because if someone is naive enough to think we all have the best speed internet all around the world than I have some ice to sell you in North Pole

darthv724d ago

I cant believe there are still people who think improvements to compression/decompression technology cant ever happen.

Hell... how is it that an HD stream can transmit over a 1mbps line? Things have been improving at a pretty fast rate. Id even guess that as things improve and new techniques are created we could actually see something like a 4k stream over 56k dialup.

It may not seem practical but it could still be possible.

mkis0074d ago

Darth,

Compression is the problem. Compression is a compromise I dont want to make. With all the people so hyped on 4k gaming you would think xbox users would hate the idea of a cloud future. Artifacts suck.

agent45324d ago

Consoles are sold:

Japan
South Korea
China
Europe
Mexico
Brazil
USA
South Africa

Only Brazil, Mexico, and South Africa will be greatly affected by the move to download/cloud gaming. PC gaming on the other hand is sold all over the world.

rainslacker4d ago

Streaming is already here, it isn't coming in one to three years. Why is there this huge dismissal of PSnow being a thing that actually works....and has worked since the PS3 days?

At least TT admits that its not going to be the biggest source of revenue for any publisher, but remain an option...kind of like the PSNow that exists now.

neutralgamer19924d ago

The reason streaming will never be big is because physical and digital media can provide far better experiences with less lag or dependence on net speed

No one can or should dismiss that what I don't like or get is how some think streaming can replace all other formats of how to play a game

gamer78044d ago

you are correct that streaming totally works right now, the problem is its not a better solution than local hardware. Imagine someone trying to play counterstrike competitive match where one person has local hardware the other is streaming, who do you think has an advantage in clarity and responsiveness?

rainslacker4d ago

@Neutral

I wouldn't say it wouldn't ever be big. I just don't think it will completely take over everything. It'll remain an option just like digital and physical happened.

@both

Yeah, right now, and likely forever, local hardware will be able to keep ahead of streaming. Even though resolutions will plateau, and internet speeds and overall available bandwidth for everyone at once will be on par in the future, computer technology just moves too fast. While cloud tech can indeed allow for more fluid development and a single build solution, it also means that all those cloud servers will require a constant upgrade to continue to keep up. For all of Azures power right now, if every "generation" of game keeps demanding more power, then MS would be looking at a constant upgrade to their servers in order to keep up.

Just think of how many PS4's, X1's, and Switches are out there. Add up all that power available for each one, and that is theoretically what would be required to maintain a cloud service which could potentially keep up with 1/4 of all the combined users at one time. Then, for every "generation" of game engine to utilize the cloud, multiply that by 4-6X that power to keep seeing improvements.

That's just one application of what a cloud network would be used for. The servers available now are able to handle the load that is in demand right now, but someone is going to have to pay for all that processing power, and these companies aren't just going to do it for free, any more than the ISP's are willing to add more sufficient internet lines for free...which they aren't because they're always waiting on government grants so they can fleece their customers more.

There's a lot working against the cloud for gaming in all it's currently marketed forms. It's not just internet speeds or availability. It's ISP's and worldwide availability. Hardware requirements on the back end. Large numbers of staffing required to handle such a massive network. Customer perception on if they want such a thing which probably isn't going to be as quick or as natural as it was with streaming movies or music. Pricing for the content providers who aren't going to just pay once, but have recurring payments to keep using the game...which means older games may be made unavailable as they aren't financially viable anymore. And the list goes on.

mkis0074d ago

With net neutrality dying, there are even more roadblocks to a cloud gaming future than there was a year ago.

+ Show (1) more replyLast reply 4d ago
TheColbertinator5d ago (Edited 5d ago )

We already are streaming our games through nvidia shield,PS Now and even the Switch in Japan.

The only problem in the reasonable future is data caps and internet speed.

wonderfulmonkeyman4d ago

I'm honestly surprised that we haven't figured out a solution to those things yet.

OneLove4d ago

Greedy corporates of course.

Srhalo4d ago

Figured out a solution you say... heh These companies are trying to figure out ways to make these things worse... Why do you think they wanted net neutrality repealed...

Nitrowolf24d ago

We’ve had a solution for over a decade, It’s just that companies refuse to act do the money and wanting to nickel and dime Their customers for as long as possible

Sam Fisher4d ago

We did, google fiber is 1gb per sec, i guess its just to expensive to mass produce

rainslacker4d ago (Edited 4d ago )

That's a solution that ISP's don't want to remedy. It is really out of the gaming company hands.

Competition helps in these cases, but there are a lot of places in the world where there isn't that much competition, and since there are only a few ISP's which control all the main data routes, with Google being the only one who cares about keeping it all open, it's not going to be remedied anytime soon. This is evidenced by these companies actively seeking an end to net neutrality, and spending tons of money to lobby for it to be eradicated.

I'm sure the content providers from many industries would love for the data caps and other problems to be eradicated. They're affected by it negatively as well.

There are places that can have great internet pretty cheap, with no data caps and reasonably high speeds. But those are areas with actual competition.

mkis0074d ago

We can only hope Musk makes good on his promise for cheap fast internet in the next 10 years. It would kill normal ISP's.

+ Show (3) more repliesLast reply 4d ago
DarXyde4d ago (Edited 4d ago )

Don't forget that, in the absence of net neutrality, the mainstream adoption of streaming will extract a heavy toll on our wallets.

ISPs could, in principle, enter contracts with the platform holders where Microsoft could-- for example-- pay Comcast to restrict PSN/Nintendo online to the more expensive packages to increase their own market share. Then Sony and Nintendo could form contracts with other ISPs and that would be a disaster because many places have ISP monopolies in the states.

Hugodastrevas4d ago

Think about how many times your internet failed you or the wifi spazzed out, now imagine depending on that to reliably game, now imagine involving other people's devices, servers, encryption and bandwidth plans across the globe...

Streaming games and cross-platform are just dreams.

Cmv384d ago

Not dreams, just undesired realities.

NeoGamer2324d ago

I prefer to have my games locally...

But, you need to think about whether this is a temporary issue or something that will always be there. In the 1990's web sites were mostly text because pictures took too much bandwidth to display. Audio and video was completely unheard of. Then, in the early 2000's the internet was fast enough that audio streaming became more and more. In the 2010's Streaming video has become a norm. And next application and game streaming can become more and more.

You can still buy photos, CDs, DVDs, blu-rays, applications, and games on physical media and mediums. But, as the internet bandwidth becomes more widely available and more capable, people will grow to rely on these things more and more.

Also, communications providers will change their data plans according to what the customers demand. Caps and limits are only because they can get away with it, and it slows growth so that infrastructure can keep up. Eventually, the infrastructure gets so fast that it can do most things wanted and goes into a mature state where there is more maintenance than technology change. At that point communication providers can make prices much more attractive.

Dlacy13g4d ago

Dennis Dyack has to be smiling at all these articles & interviews. While not exactly the same as his thoughts ...its pretty close to his vision/prediction.

TheGamingArt4d ago

About as much as fully autonomous cars

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