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Metal Gear Solid 5 The Phantom Pain: Leave the Mother Bases out of this | VideoGamer

VideoGamer: "We check out the online Mother Base infiltration mode."

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thecowsaysmoo1427d ago

I wonder how many Solid Snakes I can fit inside your mother base.

lameguy1427d ago

Jokes on you guys. My base will totally be empty... I swear. No use coming for my stuff...

thehobbyist1427d ago

But you need that stuff because in the game the nations of the world will try to shut you down and you need weapons, potentially up to the point of carrying nuclear weapons to deter them. So good luck with that strategy.

imtheman20131427d ago

Videogamer's website never loads for my ISP... it's irritating. Anyone else with a similar problem, and maybe even a solution?

OT: If someone could summarize what this article is about, that'd be much appreciated.

Energy-HL1427d ago

You're not the only Snake in Phantom Pain. In fact, potentially at least, everyone playing the game exists in the same, loosely-connected world as everyone else. Within this environment you're free to invade other player's 'Mother Base' construction and steal their hard-earned resources and items.

As Snake you can hop onto a helicopter and travel to other Mother Bases, infiltrate them and take whatever you can grab. How difficult a task this is comes down to how securely the other player has designed their base; potentially they may be protecting it with security cameras, laser sensors and guards. To build these defensive mechanisms you must either scavenge resources from within the single-player portion of the game, or take them from another player's base. Thus a cycle of scavenge, build, defend and scavenge is established.

Stealing items is done by simply moving up to whatever you want and attaching a huge balloon to it, sending it into the air and magically back to your own base. If you want to take a living guard for yourself you'll have to knock him out first and then attach the balloon. There's a certain level of comedic value to seeing this being done firsthand.

As in the single-player game, you can fast-forward the time of day if you arrive during sunlight hours. Sneaking around in the dark makes it more difficult for the guards to spot you, but it doesn't reduce the functionality of security cameras or unmanned drones. In fact, shooting a drone and setting it aflame is more noticeable in the dark then it is during daylight.

How you build your Mother Base has a strong bearing on how difficult it is to infiltrate. Platforms can be raised and positioned wherever you prefer, the smart option being to organise these in such a way so as to make climbing up to them both puzzling and time consuming. Any especially valuable resources you've collected will want to be stored at the most difficult to reach section of your base. You must, however, adhere to the basic laws of physics... that means no floating, impossible to reach platforms in midair.

As the demo continued and our Snake made his way further into the base, stealing everything from guards to mysterious shipping containers and from machine gun turrets to AA guns along the way, another Snake appeared. This is the owner of the base come back to defend what belongs to them and they quickly take our Snake out with a rocket launcher from a high platform.

What's unknown is how players become aware that their base is being infiltrated and how they can quickly act to prevent any loss of resources. How, for example, do you rush back to base while engaged in a key mission? Is it simply a matter of tough luck, or is there some form of emergency procedure that you can set in motion? How much will infiltrations like this disrupt the single player? Are there limits to how much you can take? Can you decide to opt out of this mode entirely?

Undoubtedly, this is one of those examples in which a demo has thrown up more questions than answers. Given that this is a series that has long thrived in misdirection and convolution, though, that hardly comes as a surprise.

BiggerBoss1427d ago (Edited 1427d ago )

If you happened to see the leak mp video they pretty much just summarize that.

They talk about how you can invade other players Mother Bases and steal their resources, guards, etc.
When building your own mother base you need to build it strategically with cameras, drones, placement of resources.

They then wonder if the mother base invasion aspect will interfere with the single player story portion of the game

Edit: Nevermind just read the post above mine lol:)

Gatsu1427d ago (Edited 1427d ago )

I believe enemy can only invade the Mother Base when you are visiting it yourself. At least I hope it's not possible during single player :D, imagine some tough or cool story part, then there appears alert like "enemy invading your base!". So would have to decide to go there save your base or fight this awesome boss battle etc :P...

@Below
I'm using Mozilla and can load it just fine, I dunno why you can't D: ...

imtheman20131427d ago

Yeah, lol. I saw the leaked video, but I was just wondering if this article had something exclusive or whatever. I really don't understand why I can't load this stupid website...

Energy-HL1427d ago

You're not the only Snake in Phantom Pain. In fact, potentially at least, everyone playing the game exists in the same, loosely-connected world as everyone else. Within this environment you're free to invade other player's 'Mother Base' construction and steal their hard-earned resources and items.

As Snake you can hop onto a helicopter and travel to other Mother Bases, infiltrate them and take whatever you can grab. How difficult a task this is comes down to how securely the other player has designed their base; potentially they may be protecting it with security cameras, laser sensors and guards. To build these defensive mechanisms you must either scavenge resources from within the single-player portion of the game, or take them from another player's base. Thus a cycle of scavenge, build, defend and scavenge is established.

Stealing items is done by simply moving up to whatever you want and attaching a huge balloon to it, sending it into the air and magically back to your own base. If you want to take a living guard for yourself you'll have to knock him out first and then attach the balloon. There's a certain level of comedic value to seeing this being done firsthand.

As in the single-player game, you can fast-forward the time of day if you arrive during sunlight hours. Sneaking around in the dark makes it more difficult for the guards to spot you, but it doesn't reduce the functionality of security cameras or unmanned drones. In fact, shooting a drone and setting it aflame is more noticeable in the dark then it is during daylight.

How you build your Mother Base has a strong bearing on how difficult it is to infiltrate. Platforms can be raised and positioned wherever you prefer, the smart option being to organise these in such a way so as to make climbing up to them both puzzling and time consuming. Any especially valuable resources you've collected will want to be stored at the most difficult to reach section of your base. You must, however, adhere to the basic laws of physics... that means no floating, impossible to reach platforms in midair.

As the demo continued and our Snake made his way further into the base, stealing everything from guards to mysterious shipping containers and from machine gun turrets to AA guns along the way, another Snake appeared. This is the owner of the base come back to defend what belongs to them and they quickly take our Snake out with a rocket launcher from a high platform.

What's unknown is how players become aware that their base is being infiltrated and how they can quickly act to prevent any loss of resources. How, for example, do you rush back to base while engaged in a key mission? Is it simply a matter of tough luck, or is there some form of emergency procedure that you can set in motion? How much will infiltrations like this disrupt the single player? Are there limits to how much you can take? Can you decide to opt out of this mode entirely?

Undoubtedly, this is one of those examples in which a demo has thrown up more questions than answers. Given that this is a series that has long thrived in misdirection and convolution, though, that hardly comes as a surprise.

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