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How PlayStation Now May Change Gaming, and What Constitutes a Game? Sessler's... Something

This week on Sessler's ...Something, Adam returns from vacation to ruminate on Sony's PlayStation Now announcement, and the ramifications it could have on the future of consoles. Plus: Adam responds to criticisms of his game of the year choice, and ponders the definition of "game."

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TheFallenAngel1349d ago ShowReplies(2)
AndroidVageta1349d ago ShowReplies(2)
SpiralTear1349d ago

Didn't he already discuss this "what makes a game" deal? And whaddya know: his opinion hasn't changed.

I personally have issue with Gone Home because so many critics are saying that they would like future games to follow its example and do things like it. While I have no problem with experimentation, I do have a problem with the idea that progressive game design needs to take a singular form, namely this "interactive experience" form (which is a terrible term that screams "political correctness", in my opinion). Just call it a game.

And games can be a lot of things. I've had just as much fun with a story-driven title like The Walking Dead as I have with a more traditional masterpiece like Super Mario 3D World. There's no one right way to make a great game.

In a way, I feel like I'm making the same argument as the critics who are praising Gone Home, but in reverse. Games can be different things and don't need to rely on some heartstring-pulling, super personal narrative to be progressive and innovative. That's the magic of the medium.

coolbeans1348d ago

I like what you're saying regarding progressive game design, and the comment in general, but I get a bit lost on the few parts like "Games can be different things and don't need to rely on some heartstring-pulling, super personal narrative to be progressive and innovative" because the few critics I've seen/heard talk about it aren't really focused on demanding the 'heartstring-pulling stuff' but rather that avant-garde gameplay template that's able to feel like a middle ground so as to still be considered a game (on another note: metacritics users befuddle me).

Unlike similar titles I've played like Dear Esther, GH is structured to where not only to you get a story behind it but also had to do some level of greater interaction besides "walk past invisible trigger" in order to progress.

SpiralTear1348d ago

I understand what you're saying, don't sweat it. From what I've heard, critics seem more enamored about the game's narrative than its design, Sessler for sure. They say "you feel like the game is talking about you" or something similar. That's fine, but how? Many of the reviews I've read have never explained that, just referencing the personal subject matter and ignoring how that subject matter is arranged.

I'm not saying that they're ignoring the game design portion of these types of games; I'm just saying that they seem more impressed by the story than the game design which contributed to that non-linearity.

Of course, that's my own opinion.

coolbeans1348d ago (Edited 1348d ago )

I'll take your word for it simply b/c I didn't bother to dive into many reviews since most said "just get it." Went ahead and took that advice quickly since first week deal was $2 off. Maybe I can see what others had to say about it now.

"I'm just saying that they seem more impressed by the story than the game design which contributed to that non-linearity."

That's kinda/sorta surprising to me. I can respect certain aspects of it but the story overall became sort of a weak point to me when it's all said and done. When every element is added together as a cohesive whole that just happens to be discovered by you at every corner, the writing comes off more as laying out it's 'emotional' stuff pretty thickly.

_FantasmA_1349d ago ShowReplies(1)
snookiegamer1348d ago (Edited 1348d ago )

Well, I don't see the big deal here. Adam Sessler is entitled to an opinion just like anyone else.

I subscribe to Rev3 because they're intelligent people discussing/reviewing games. I like Adam, Tara and the team @Rev3. I'm glad Max Scoffield left and went to Destructoid. I didn't like his dry sarcastic humour, and he's been rude to others he's presented with.

Adam Sessler is a cool dude IMO..He asks the difficult questions (see the recent MS/xbox event interview), and doesn't kiss butt. You can add plenty of disagrees if you want to OR agree, it's upto you. Yes, strangely you're entitled to that too :)

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