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Does the power of today’s consoles keep up with historical trends?

Ars - "Recently, we've looked at how prices for video game software and hardware have increased over the years, and we've found that when you adjust for inflation, console games and hardware are now cheaper than ever. But how has the raw hardware power you get for that money changed over the years?"

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arstechnica.com
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kneon1496d ago

Sony has certainly been extremely consistent on their memory

PS1 - 2MB
PS2 - 32MB
PS3 - 512MB
PS4 - 8192MB

Each generation has exactly 16x the memory of the previous generation.

MoonWheel1496d ago

I doubt we will have 128 gigs of memory for the ps5. It will either be much less memory or a different format that can replace it. We'll find out in about 10 years lol.

kneon1496d ago

I agree, at some point there is just no benefit to adding more memory, even 4K gaming won't need 128GB.

And unless we all start buying 100+ inch TV's then I expect 4K to be the final resolution in wide deployment. I know people are working on TVs with resolutions of 8K and beyond but those are pointless. Once you are at 4K it makes more sense to focus on improvements to contrast and color accuracy. Resolution increases beyond 4K will have minimal impact.

TheLastVoiceOFsanity1496d ago

@Kneon

resolution beyond 4K does matter. 4K is basically a 8 megapixel image in motion, and 8K is a 33 megapixel image in motion. they say you don't really have to push resolution beyond 8K because the human eye can't see any detail beyond 8K, but i still think resolutions above 8K would make since for films so the image quality is still high when you zoom in. gaming doesn't need resolutions beyond 8K, but i think movies do.

FamilyGuy1496d ago (Edited 1496d ago )

Reminds me of the flow from 16-bit era, to 32-bit then Nintendos 64, i think PS1 was 128-bit

After that "bit" was no longer mentioned.

GuruMeditation1496d ago

The ps1 was a 32 bit console. It was the ps2 that was 128-bit, and the last major console release to use 'bits' as part of their advertising campaign.