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Rise of the Triad Review | GIZORAMA

GIZORAMA - Few genres inspire the same sense of bitter nostalgia that first-person shooters engender. While by no means the very first FPS, Doom set the standard for what the genre would be for many years: intense, fast-paced, every level a fight for your very survival while you scramble to find keys and health packs amidst hordes of fast-moving and lethally clever enemies that you must gun down with inventive and lethal weaponry. For better or for worse, somewhere along the way it transitioned to the endlessly lucrative Call of Duty model where the levels relied more on cinematic setpieces to guide the player along, and the challenge was greatly reduced by regenerating health and generous ammo drops. In recent years, some shooters have aimed to buck this trend by offering more old-school gameplay, such as Bulletstorm and Serious Sam. Joining the ranks of these illustrious throwbacks is Interceptor Entertainment’s Rise of the Triad and it has what it takes to stand among the best in classic FPS titles.

Rise of the Triad is the debut title from newly-minted indie studio Interceptor Entertainment, a team consisting of 30 people from all over the world working out of their homes (a business model that could stand to take off, now that it’s proven to work) and published by shareware-era DOS heroes, Apogee Games (which now exists as some kind of sister company to 3D Realms, which it changed its name to in the first place, so whatever) exclusively on Good Old Games and Steam. As its title may hint to you, the game is a loving remake of 90′s cult favorite shooter…Rise of the Triad, created by Doom co-creator Tom Hall and originally intended as a sequel to Wolfenstein. It revels in many tropes of the time, as well as more specific designs from the original title, such as health kits, an arsenal consisting mostly of rocket launchers, five selectable characters (all different enough to be appreciable), and over-the-top violence.

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