New 'The Evil Within' Details Revealed

Tons of details were revealed such as the fact that there will be moments where characters have to work together in order to defeat enemies, the lack of color and why the game is called "Psycho Break" in Japan.

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Tdmd1269d ago

"There are not many sound effects..."

Isn't that a weird thing to say about an horror game?

I gotta play this one with my girlfriend sitting at my side. :)

Minato-Namikaze1269d ago

To scare her? or comfort you?

IaMs121269d ago

probably a little bit of both! I think im going to try and convince mine to give it a shot too haha

Tdmd1269d ago (Edited 1269d ago )

A bit of both: to scare her and make it seems I'm not scared too. lol

metalgod881269d ago

Honestly man, the less audio there is, the more unnerving a horror game can be. But at the same time, it can feel empty and hollow. Although, sometimes, that's exactly what the creator may want the player to feel.

OhMyGandhi1269d ago (Edited 1269d ago )

I feel it's the complete opposite...For most situations.
For example, In my favorite survival horror title to date, Silent Hill 2, Sound effects MADE the game. The creepy clanging, crashing, and all around discourse of the soundtrack proved to make the experience hyper-realistic. It was no longer a dark hallway to meander down, but rather, a hallway that is seemingly alive with a presence the player cannot see, but can hear through the muffled footsteps on hardwood floors.

I believe that MUSIC can absolutely destroy a survival horror game on the other hand, because it's way too forceful and contrived, and it breaks the immersion that comes with a natural environment. Silent Hill 2 played music sparingly, and only with cutscenes that required it, otherwise the game was entirely sound-effect based.

The LACK of sound effects of sorts can help if the intended effect is a jump scare, otherwise it can make the game feel dead, bringing the player to focus on what the game designer does next, and yet again, breaking the illusion.

It all depends on the kind of game. the older version of Slender put you in a forest without much of any sound, and that made it incredibly unnerving, I suppose that it just has to be consistent in the game, otherwise a sound effect-heavy game like Silent Hill, turning dead quiet can make the player feel like someone hit a mute button on recorded noises, rather than believe the illusion that the sounds were organic in nature, and came from within the environment.

Tdmd1269d ago

I'm with Rusted on this one. Creepy sound effects were what scared me the most about Dead Space and (previous gen) Resident Evil games. As clichè as it might be, a loud scratching sound at the end of a very very long, dark corridor never fails to make me clench my teeth...

metalgod881269d ago

I completely agree with you RustedMan on pretty much all fronts. Thanks for your awesome response. Though I guess I should have been more specific, but when I said less audio, I meant music specifically, but didn't mention it. =\

I've always loved dark ambient music when roaming around and have it pick up when game action picks up.

But yeah, pretty much everything that I was thinking you pretty much said. Hats off to you sir.

SolidGear31268d ago

Actually sounds like a great idea. Have to try it with mine ^_^

EverydayGuy1268d ago

Hope the music don't make it obvious about a creature popping up out of nowhere.