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Submitted by nintendofeed 656d ago | review

F-Zero (SNES/Wii U eShop) Review | Nintendo Feed

Today, we most certainly take the graphical capabilities of racing games for granted. That's something we can all admit to quite easily. However, when the prospect of this form of gameplay was thrown onto gamers of the 90s, it was quite a dazzling prospect. F-Zero was the first of many titles that would take advantage of Nintendo's new dazzling graphical functionality, Mode-7. (F-Zero, Retro, Wii U) 9/10

PopRocks359  +   656d ago
The article image made me think for an instant that GX was on the eShop. Fool me once...

Anyway, nice review. No disagreements here.
RAFFwaff  +   656d ago
I'm in UK and the extra speed we've now got in this version, unlike the old Pal cart is eye-blistering. I honestly don't remember the game being so fast, or that we European gamers were missing out that much, but man this game flies and add the fact that it's great (semi)portability on the gamepad and it's 30p? First ESSENTIAL virtual console purchase!

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