Top
150°

Samsung puts the kibosh on SSD reliability worries

If you're one of the (apparently) many out there scared half to death not over what's residing in your closet at night, but that your recently purchased SSD will wear itself out in no time flat, here's a little reassurance. According to Michael Yang, flash marketing manager at Samsung, a flash device rated at 100,000 write cycles can write 100,000 times "to every single (memory) cell within the device," and of course, it won't continuously write to the same cell over and over thanks to a process dubbed "wear leveling". In case you still needed a tad more evidence, he also stated that "a pattern could be perpetually repeated in which a 64GB SSD is completely filled with data, erased, filled again, then erased again every hour of every day for years, and the user still wouldn't reach the theoretical write limit."

Read Full Story >>
engadget.com
The story is too old to be commented.
Kakkoii3413d ago (Edited 3413d ago )

That certainly settles my qualms with SSD's. I had always thought they'd degrade after a year of use.

Looking forward to seeing more solid state stuff in PMP's.

Guwapo773413d ago

"In case you still needed a tad more evidence, he also stated that "a pattern could be perpetually repeated in which a 64GB SSD is completely filled with data, erased, filled again, then erased again every hour of every day for years"

This has to be one of the most open ended statements I have ever seen. Would that equate to 3-5 years? But luckly a guy named Thinker in the Engadget forums decided to do some math for us...

Thinker
@ Feb 23rd 2008 10:18PM
Assuming you write 1 GB worth of data each day, it will take 64 days to fill the card. So one ("1") write cycle = 64 days. A 100,000 write cycle will take 100,000 x 64 = 6.4 million days of usage at 1 GB per day before the limit is reached. This is the equivalent of 6,400,000/365.25 = 17,522 years of usage.

Basically from his great smartness we are able to see that this SDD would outlast the tech found in the computer itself. Once they become more affordable, I'll definately be buying one. Especially after 1 of 2 Raptors in Raid 0 died on me about 2 weeks ago (but then again it was 6 years old and stayed on 24/7).

xplosneer3413d ago

That you don't always just write 1 GB per day. You could erase, the write again, many times, expecially Caching internet files etc.

But good job for finding proof, I give bubbles.

Kakkoii3413d ago (Edited 3413d ago )

Or, Calculating under the original statement.

1 Cycle per hour or 24 Full cycles a day of 64GB each.

356 days in a year

356 days x 24 cycles = 8544 cycles

100000 cycles ÷ 8544 cycles = 11.704 years

Which means. Under the original scenario. The SSD would last 11 years, 7 months and 4 days.

Assuming the amount of cycles they said are true.

Guwapo773413d ago

Thank you for the Bubble Xplosneer.

As for Kakkoii (handsome in Japanese?...can't remember) Anyways, thanks for the further analysis. 11 years is a mighty large improvement over current HDDs. I can only hope they will find ways to increase its longevity.