Submitted by BitnerdGX 1132d ago | article

The Complete Kingdom Hearts Timeline - Final Part: Renewed Hope

GameXplain.com: "For six years, Kingdom Hearts fans have been waiting for the third game in the series. And now, with six games in total, the plot is a near labyrinthine mess of connections and revelations. It's with that in mind that I have decided to unravel the plot of the entire series for those who may have missed the opportunity to play some of the spin-offs and those who just want a refresher before diving into the new game. Today we conclude this ongoing feature with Part 28." (3DS, Kingdom Hearts, Kingdom Hearts 3D: Dream Drop Distance, Kingdom Hearts II, Kingdom Hearts Re:Chain of Memories, Kingdom Hearts Re:coded, Kingdom Hearts: 358/2 Days, Kingdom Hearts: Birth By Sleep, Mobile, Nintendo DS, PS Vita, PS2, PS3, PSP)

andresegers  +   1133d ago
I never thought this day would come
terrorofdeath  +   1132d ago
It's not over :) cause one day when KH3 comes out, another recap with KH3D will be coming! Ahh it never endssss
Blues Cowboy  +   1132d ago
This is really useful - I've played both PS2 games and all the spin-offs except Re:Coded, and I've pretty much lost the plot over the years (thanks to all that jargon mainly). Wish I knew about this article series ahead of time, going to pore over the whole thing later.
Moby-Royale  +   1132d ago
NexGen  +   1132d ago
No, it's "pore." Check a dictionary before you correct someone Moby.
Moby-Royale  +   1132d ago
If I say its pour, then its pour.

If you don't like it you can get off my planet.

Walk on fool.
Freakazoid2012  +   1131d ago
Some confusion appears to exist regarding the use of pour and pore.

Charlie complains that he has to pour through stacks of badly-written letters to the editor every day.

In this context the word should be pore. The usual idiom is “to pore over.” Apparently the preposition “through” has entered into use, as in the above quotation, and as in this headline in the New York Times:

Teachers Pore Through Stacks Of Possibilities

The verb pore, with the meaning “examine closely,” may derive from two Old English words, a verb, spyrian, meaning “to investigate, examine,” and a noun, spor, meaning “a trace, vestige.”

The noun pore, meaning “an opening in the skin,” is not related to the verb in the expression “to pore over.” The noun comes from a Greek word meaning “a passageway.”

The verb pour, meaning to transfer water or some other substance from a container, came into English by way of Old French from a Latin verb, purare, “to purify.” In ritual practice, objects are purified by pouring water over them. The English word pure comes from Latin purus, “pure.” The Latin verb came from the Latin noun.

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