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Time Warner Bandwidth Cap Could Hurt Gaming

Time Warner recently announced that the company intends to consider a usage-based system. This means that users (cable customers) would pay depending on how much bandwidth they use. If they go over the allotted bandwidth on their plan, they get charged overage fees. The system works much like cell phone minutes with customers having the choice of four plans at five, ten, 20 and 40 gigabytes.

The story discusses the impact this could have on XBL, gaming, and movie downloads. But this could apply to all the internet capable gaming consoles and PCs.

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socomnick3413d ago

This plan is completely stupid I hope all the other Isp dont fall to this bs.

JsonHenry3413d ago

Go ahead. And when other ISPs rise to power because they did not adopt such a ridiculous plan don't come crawling back begging for my business.

dantesparda3412d ago (Edited 3412d ago )

Already quite a few ISPs are using this method, and only more will follow suite. Welcome to the new world where things that you's to be free will now cost you money like gaming online for example, (errr hmm, XBL & WOW) remember Sega wanted to charge you too on the DC for their online capability, but couldnt find a way to do it/make it compelling/worth it, whereas MS did. Heck, MS is even trying to bring that payment system over to the PC with Live, but those far is failing at making it sell there (that's cuz most PC users arent dumb little fanboy kids who wil gladly pay simply because they are fans. They realize that its not worth paying for something that they've had for free forever, just to get a few little gimmicky features.

Also, remember must people arent using up as much bandwith as we are, so they either are not even gonna notice it or care cuz it wont effect them much. It'll be us the power users that are gonna get most effected by this. But i hope Im wrong

LanRanger3413d ago

Claiming this hurts *gaming* is a bit unfair. Gaming is actually pretty low bandwidth. The author uses movies as an example, but just because it can be done on a console doesn't make downloading a movie gaming.

That being said I positively hate the idea of metered service.

Kyur4ThePain3413d ago

I was just wondering how much traffic online gaming actually generates.
It would be interesting to see actual numbers for different genres.

LanRanger3413d ago

I did a little bit of research. Best answer I can find is that most games use somewhere between 5-30MB per hour, depending on the game. Even if you assume the high end of that spectrum you could play for several hours every day and have plenty of bandwidth left over for standard web usage even with a 5GB cap.

*Hosting* a game, on the other hand, is a different story. It can eat up several hundred megabytes per hour, which could become a problem very quickly with a low cap.

Panthers3413d ago

They better not do this. I hate cell phone plans. They are retarded and stupid. Cable should not do this. I have TWC and I would change in a heart beat if this happens.

joevfx3413d ago

if they do this plan i am moving to a FIOS connection as soon as its available in san francisco. they are gonan lose a HUGE amoutn of customers. They only reason they are doing this cause cable internet is hitting its ceiling of performance, its all about FIOS.

DJ3411d ago

And it's such an awesome service (and definitely the fastest). I can host 24 people in a match of Warhawk, which is pretty sweet.

Zhuk3413d ago

This is how all ISP's do it in Australia, except most of them 'shape' your bandwith if you go over your limit to around 64k/128k

It's sad to see the US going backwards and taking these steps as well, I think all countries really need to start thinking about serious investment in infrastructure for broadband

IntelligentAj3413d ago

I can't understand why they disagreed with you on this. It seems like a pretty sensible comment. Oh well. I would consider this a step backward for consumers. They are trying to recoup because they know their plan to create a tiered bandwidth system won't get by the FCC.

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